Mapplethorpe’s Obsessions

 The news has just gone out that LACMA and the Getty have jointly acquired Robert Mapplethorpe’s art and archival material, including more than 2,000 works by the artist. Over at the Getty’s blog, the Iris, curator Frances Terpak discusses how the acquisition came together. Here, our own curator, Britt Salvesen, writes about what an archive of this magnitude can reveal about the artist.

In Just Kids, her moving account of her friendship with Robert Mapplethorpe, Patti Smith states that she knew from the first moment of meeting him in 1967 that he had artistic genius and ambition. At the time of their meeting, both Mapplethorpe and Smith were primarily making drawings—a practical medium, given their lack of funds for art supplies. Smith would go on to achieve renown as a writer and singer, Mapplethorpe as a photographer.

Among the many things an archive can reveal is the artist’s thematic obsessions—their origins and persistence over time. Beginning with his early drawings, jewelry designs, and sculptural assemblages, Mapplethorpe demonstrated a fascination with Catholic iconography, embodied sexuality, and symbolic geometric motifs. He challenged himself to forge an individual style using found materials: advertisements, packaging, rabbit’s feet, even lobster claws from the restaurant next door to the Chelsea Hotel.

Robert Mapplethorpe, Untitled, c. 1971, promised gift of the Robert Mapplethrope Foundation. © Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation. Used by permission.

In photography, Mapplethorpe discovered a medium in which to depict all his thematic obsessions with total visual consistency. After experimenting freely with a Polaroid camera in the early 1970s, he acquired more sophisticated equipment that allowed him greater control over light and tone. In Calla Lily (1988), he creates an extreme contrast between the white flower and the black background. In Tulip (1984), he uses a filtered light to establish a range of grays.

Robert Mapplethorpe, Calla Lily, 1988, jointly acquired by LACMA and The J. Paul Getty Trust. Partial gift of The Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation; partial purchase with funds from The David Geffen Foundation and The J. Paul Getty Trust. © Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation. Used by permission.

Robert Mapplethorpe, Tulip, 1984, jointly acquired by LACMA and The J. Paul Getty Trust. Partial gift of The Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation; partial purchase with funds from The David Geffen Foundation and The J. Paul Getty Trust. © Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation. Used by permission.

Despite the rather wild reputation he fostered, ultimately Mapplethorpe was an extremely disciplined artist and a hardworking perfectionist. Without those traits, one cannot produce a body of work comprising nearly 2,000 editions in a period of only around two decades. Once he hit his stride as a fine-art photographer and began to run a studio, Mapplethorpe was rigorous in terms of quality control and documentation. With its binders of contact sheets and folders of correspondence, the archive preserves in great detail Mapplethorpe’s rise to prominence as a photographer. For those like Patti Smith who knew him when he had nothing, Mapplethorpe’s success as an artist was only a matter of time.

Britt Salvesen, Curator and Department Head, Wallis Annenberg Photography Department

6 Responses to Mapplethorpe’s Obsessions

  1. Mia Wicklund says:

    Welcome news for Mapplethorpe fans! It’s wonderful that those who love him and revere his work keep him in the spotlight as an ongoing artistic and cultural influence.

  2. Allison Agsten says:

    Congrats, Britt! I was so excited to read the news yesterday. What an impressive trove for our city. I reconnected with Maplethorpe’s work recently thanks to Just Kids (very moving, just as you noted)and am looking forward to connecting with it on an even deeper level now that the collection is in LA to stay.

  3. John Krill says:

    And no place to show any of it!

  4. AitchCS says:

    When will this collection become an exhibit? I live out of town and it would help me plan my trip.
    thank you—

  5. Maurice Destouet says:

    Wonderful news. Reading “Just Kids” now, and will look forward to having access to the collection……at some point.

  6. Anonymous says:

    When When When will it be shown? Does anyone know if LACMA or the Getty is showing any of his work?

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,090 other followers

%d bloggers like this: