Director David Slade on the Legacy of Stanley Kubrick

January 23, 2013

Our free Stanley Kubrick app for iPad/iPhone (and, coming soon, Android!) includes a number of original interviews, including an excerpt from this one with director David Slade.

Slade was kind enough to visit during the installation of the exhibition to share his memories and thoughts about the legacy of Kubrick’s filmmaking. Slade was at Kubrick’s headquarters in the UK on the day the legendary director passed away, a day he recalls in the interview segment included in the app. But Slade’s tribute extends well beyond Kubrick’s death, to the lasting impact of his films on directors working today. Here, he talks about being shaken by A Clockwork Orange, and what it means to cultivate a creative vision.

Amy Heibel, video by Alexa Oona Schulz


How Do You Clean a 242-Year-Old Painting? Very Carefully

January 23, 2013

In early February the National Museum of Korea, in Seoul, will present Art Across America—the first major historical survey of American art ever to be presented in Korea. The exhibition was co-organized by LACMA, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, and the Terra Foundation. LACMA sent nearly forty paintings to be part of the show, including major works like Mary Cassatt’s Mother about to Wash Her Sleepy Child,   Georgia O’Keeffe’s Horse’s Skull with Pink Rose, and Henry Inman’s No-Tin (Wind). Also among the paintings was John Singleton Copley’s Portrait of a Lady, painted in 1771 (learn more about the painting here).

Before Treatment: John Singleton Copley, Portrait of a Lady, 1771, purchased with funds provided by the American Art Council, Anna Bing Arnold, F. Patrick Burns Bequest, Mr. and Mrs. William Preston Harrison Collection, David M. Koester, Art Museum Council, Jo Ann and Julian Ganz, Jr., The Ahmanson Foundation, Ray Stark, and other donors, photo by Yosi Poseilov, © 2013 Museum Associates/LACMA

Before Treatment: John Singleton Copley, Portrait of a Lady, 1771, purchased with funds provided by the American Art Council, Anna Bing Arnold, F. Patrick Burns Bequest, Mr. and Mrs. William Preston Harrison Collection, David M. Koester, Art Museum Council, Jo Ann and Julian Ganz, Jr., The Ahmanson Foundation, Ray Stark, and other donors, photo by Yosi Poseilov, © 2013 Museum Associates/LACMA

In advance of its journey to Korea, Portrait of a Lady made a stop in LACMA’s conservation center for a much-needed cleaning. We captured the process on video so you could see the remarkable transformation.

Our amazing conservators are able to carry out extraordinary efforts like this thanks to contributions from our members and gifts in any amount to the LACMA Fund. So, as you peruse the list of great benefits you can get as a member (like free tickets to Stanley Kubrick and Caravaggio, and free general admission all year), bear in mind that being a member means even more—we can preserve history thanks to you.

After Treatment: John Singleton Copley, Portrait of a Lady, 1771, purchased with funds provided by the American Art Council, Anna Bing Arnold, F. Patrick Burns Bequest, Mr. and Mrs. William Preston Harrison Collection, David M. Koester, Art Museum Council, Jo Ann and Julian Ganz, Jr., The Ahmanson Foundation, Ray Stark, and other donors, photo by Yosi Poseilov, © 2013 Museum Associates/LACMA

After Treatment: John Singleton Copley, Portrait of a Lady, 1771, purchased with funds provided by the American Art Council, Anna Bing Arnold, F. Patrick Burns Bequest, Mr. and Mrs. William Preston Harrison Collection, David M. Koester, Art Museum Council, Jo Ann and Julian Ganz, Jr., The Ahmanson Foundation, Ray Stark, and other donors, photo by Yosi Poseilov, © 2013 Museum Associates/LACMA

Scott Tennent


The Results Are In: What’s Your Favorite Kubrick Film?

January 22, 2013

Two weeks ago, we asked our social media followers to vote for their favorite Stanley Kubrick film to be shown in an encore screening in conjunction with LACMA’s exhibition. With more than 200 responses, 2001: A Space Odyssey came out on top with 26.4% of the vote. The runner-up was A Clockwork Orange with 19.5% of the vote. The screenings of our two winners have been scheduled (February 2—A Clockwork Orange, March 1—2001: A Space Odyssey) and tickets are now available.

We also asked for brief responses on why a certain film was their favorite. Below are some of the highlights.

2001: A Space Odyssey

  • “It is timeless. It is yesterday’s, today’s, and tomorrow’s . . . “
  • “No science fiction movie has said more about all life on earth and stayed as relevant to our understanding of humanity and its trajectory.”
  • “ . . . It says so much with so little narrative.”
  • “Timeless, grand in scope, holds the mirror up to humanity’s role in the universe!”
  • “Beauty that transcends any decade, generation, or culture.”
  • “It overwhelms our aesthetic sensibilities, as well as captures our ongoing desire to understand where we come from and where we are going.”
  • 2001 is a movie worth seeing a thousand times and each time offers something different.”
  • “Powerful, cinematic, and innovative, the wondrous special effects to the layers of detail and themes make it a superb and wonderfully dense experience.”
  • “Because science!”
  • “The symbolism, the style, & the writing—all as new and striking as they were when it was first released. And who can top that ending, other than *maybe* David Lynch? A masterpiece.”
  • 2001 will keep a conversation going for an eternity.”
  • 2001 went where no commercial film making had gone before: into a realm of mind-bending thematic elements, abstract narrative, and experimental film technique; and yet it succeeded above all as a fantastic entertainment.”
  • “Because it is the greatest film ever made.”
2001: A Space Odyssey, set photo, directed by Stanley Kubrick, 1965-68

2001: A Space Odyssey, set photo, directed by Stanley Kubrick, 1965-68

A Clockwork Orange

  • “This film is a real horror show!”
  • “Visually stunning, a work of art.”
  • Clockwork is an exhilarating juxtaposition of how messy it is to be human against our futile attempts to civilize and sterilize society.”
  • “It makes me feel “off” of balance in a strange and intricate way.”
  • “I saw it when I was a teenager, and I couldn’t sleep for a couple of nights. It was that powerful.”
  • “It shows how easily our minds can be manipulated.”
  • “Costumes, music, Malcolm McDowell, & dystopia.”
  • “Korova Milk Bar!”

The Shining

  • “This is hands down the best horror film of all time.”
  • “This movie ruined all future horror movies for me . . . #GoldStandard”
  • “My best friend and I have watched The Shining religiously since we were in elementary school . . .which might be weird. But we’re horror nuts.”
  • “I like blood.”
  • “Chilling, evocative, and simply brilliant.”
  • “Ambiance, snowed-in hotel setting, music, characters, actors, REDRUM, Tony, the sound of Danny driving his bigwheel on the carpet and then on the marble, the maze, Room 237, all work and no play makes Jack a dull boy . . . brilliance!”

    The Shining, directed by Stanley Kubrick, 1980, The daughters of Grady (Lisa and Louise Burns). © Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.

    The Shining, directed by Stanley Kubrick, 1980, The daughters of Grady (Lisa and Louise Burns). © Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.

Barry Lyndon

  • “ . . . it’s a landmark in cinematography, and the opportunities to see it in its native 35mm are only going to be more scarce as time passes.”
  •  “The exquisite imagery, particularly the candle lit scenes, really do cry out for the big screen. And, I do like the story line of one man trying to raise himself up by his bootstraps, only to be kicked back down by the very people he wants to be like. This is a film that is full of irony and subtle humor.”
  • “Kubrick’s approach to the lighting. The storyline. Overall an amazing film.”
  • Barry Lyndon is an underrated masterpiece. Leon Vitali gives an unforgettable performance as Lord Bullingdon.”
  • “Beautiful and under appreciated.”
Barry Lyndon, directed by Stanley Kubrick, 1973-75, Barry Lyndon (Ryan O'Neal) and the Chevalier de Balibari (James Magee) at the roulette table. © Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.

Barry Lyndon, directed by Stanley Kubrick, 1973-75, Barry Lyndon (Ryan O’Neal) and the Chevalier de Balibari (James Magee) at the roulette table. © Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.

Lolita

  • “James Mason’s shattering performance. Sue Lyon’s brittle innocence. Peter Sellers’ mania in all Clare Quilty’s guises. Pedophilia as Gothic horror, with the most horrible of the horror being this: Kubrick makes us identify with the monster who robbed Lolita of her golden goggle.”
  • “You never know if you like or dislike the characters. It challenges your own criteria.”
  • “Nabokov abides.”

Dr. Strangelove or: How I learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb

  • “It is hysterical, timely, and timeless.”
  • The complete package of satire, characters, and outlandish story is always a welcome to watch, as I personally always learn something new every time I watch it.”
  • “Peter Sellers plays three separate characters. There is so much pertinent and funny information re: war, politics, and sex. The characterization is excellent, along with the beautiful and interesting cinematography in black and white.”
  • Dr. Strangelove captures the absurdity and chaos that ran rampant during the atomic age. Also. Peter. F*cking. Sellers.”
  • “A daring mix of political satire, social commentary, and comedy.”

Full Metal Jacket

  • “The recruit training scenes remind me of my time in the Marine Corps.”
  • Full Metal Jacket is the quintessential Kubrick film that makes you laugh while looking at the blackest part of the human heart.”
  • “It inspired me to be a photographer.”
  • “It is a darkly satirical dramatic comedy that only the great master Kubrick’s multi-layered brain is able to more than successfully accomplish. 10 out of 10 steers and queers.”

Eyes Wide Shut

  • “It’s an underrated visual masterpiece.”
  • Eyes Wide Shut was entertaining, while pushing me into questioning the motives behind sex, and the power it holds over people . . . ”

    Eyes Wide Shut, directed by Stanley Kubrick, 1999, Tom Cruise, Nicole Kidman, and Stanley Kubrick during a break in shooting on the set. © Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc. Photo: Manuel Harlan

    Eyes Wide Shut, directed by Stanley Kubrick, 1999, Tom Cruise, Nicole Kidman, and Stanley Kubrick during a break in shooting on the set. © Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc. Photo: Manuel Harlan

Paths of Glory

  • “I love it because it’s the best anti-war war film.”
  • “While Kubrick approaches this story in his typical unsentimental, clinical style, Paths of Glory is heart wrenching to watch. He has it both ways, and it works brilliantly.”

The Killing

  • “Because I am enamored of films noirs and this is a fabulous example.”

General Admission is Free Today!

January 21, 2013

Today, join us for another Target Free Holiday Monday at LACMA. Stop by from 11 am–5 pm for free general admission (note that paid admission is required for Stanley Kubrick and Caravaggio and His Legacy), family art-making activities, gallery tours, live music, and more.

On the plaza at 12:30 and 2:45 pm, renowned jazz musician Ernie Andrews will pay tribute to the life and work of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

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Ernie Andrews

Throughout the day, docents will lead bilingual tours throughout permanent collection galleries and the special exhibition Lost Line: Contemporary Art from the Collection.

Chris Burden’s Metropolis II will be running for special hours just for this Target Free Holiday Monday. The piece will be on view throughout the day and running from 11:30am–12:30 pm; 1:30–2:30 pm; and 3:30–4:30 pm.

After enjoying the galleries, visitors can pick up drawing materials on the plaza and sketch outdoors from 12:30 to 3:30 pm. The Boone Children’s Gallery will also be open throughout the day for families to take part in a brush painting activity. Make sure to get your timed tickets to the gallery on site when you arrive. Families can also venture to our Korean art galleries at 2 pm for a special interactive story time.

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Boone Children’s Gallery

Today is also the last day to see the exhibition Ed Ruscha: Standard. Filled with more than 300 examples of the renowned artist’s graphic and philosophical depictions of everyday objects, the show is perfect for kids and adults alike.

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Ed Ruscha, Standard Station, 1966, screenprint, Museum Acquisition Fund, © 2012 Edward J. Ruscha IV, all rights reserved, photo © Museum Associates/LACMA

Make a day of it by eating lunch or dinner at Ray’s, grabbing a specialty coffee at C+M, or bringing a picnic to enjoy in the park.

Alex Capriotti


This Weekend at LACMA: Ed Ruscha Closes, Okyo’s Cranes on View, Liz Glynn Performance, Caravaggio Film Series, and More

January 18, 2013

Pick a day, any day on this three-day weekend and you will find plenty to see and do at LACMA. First, the exhibitions: this is your last chance to see Ed Ruscha: Standard, which closes on Monday. (And don’t forget: Monday is a Target Free Holiday Monday!) The exhibition features prints, paintings, and even a couple of films from LACMA’s in-depth collection of Ruscha’s oeuvre. If you’re at all a fan of Ruscha, it’s not to be missed.

Ed Ruscha, Standard Station, 1966, Museum Acquisition Fund, © 2012 Ed Ruscha. All rights reserved, photo © 2012 Museum Associates/LACMA

Ed Ruscha, Standard Station, 1966, Museum Acquisition Fund, © 2012 Ed Ruscha. All rights reserved, photo © 2012 Museum Associates/LACMA

Also closing this weekend is a photography installation in our modern galleries, Imagining the Modern Self: Photographs from the Audrey and Sydney Irmas Collection—featuring experimental self-portraits by Berenice Abbot, Piet Zwart, Henri-Cartier Bresson, and others.

Anton Stankowski, Simultaneous Enlargement, 1937, the Audrey and Sydney Irmas Collection, © Stankowski Foundation

Anton Stankowski, Simultaneous Enlargement, 1937, the Audrey and Sydney Irmas Collection, © Stankowski Foundation

Other exhibitions are entering their final weeks: Caravaggio and His Legacy  closes February 10,while Lost Line: Contemporary Art from the Collection,  Jim Shaw’s Dream Drawings, and Michael Heizer: Actual Size all close February 24. Check our full list of exhibitions for even more on view, including Stanley Kubrick, Robert Mapplethorpe, and others.

You may have also read in the Los Angeles Times about our latest acquisition: Maruyama Okyo’s Cranes, a beautifully detailed pair of screens from 1772, which have hardly ever been shown in public until now. They make their debut in the Pavilion for Japanese Art this weekend.

 Maruyama Okyo, Cranes, 1772 (An'ei period, 1772-1780), gift of Camilla Chandler Frost in honor of Robert T. Singer

Maruyama Okyo, Cranes, 1772 (An’ei period, 1772-1780), gift of Camilla Chandler Frost in honor of Robert T. Singer

Artist Liz Glynn, who is also featured in Lost Line, will be on hand Saturday and Sunday afternoons for a free performance in the B. Gerald Cantor Sculpture Garden—“[De]-lusions of Grandeur”. Glynn will work with other sculptors in the garden to replicate and recombine parts of the Rodin sculptures on view in the garden—check out this behind-the-scenes post to learn a little more. The performance is part of a series that will take place at LACMA throughout the year, each dealing with monumental sculptures on the museum’s campus. You can learn more from Glynn’s project blog.

Liz Glynn, Study for Chapter 1: The Myth of Singularity (after Rodin), 2012, © 2012 Liz Glynn

Liz Glynn, Study for Chapter 1: The Myth of Singularity (after Rodin), 2012, © 2012 Liz Glynn

For those coming to see Bodies and Shadows: Caravaggio and His Legacy  this weekend, take a look at the films we have lined up tonight, tomorrow night, and Sunday afternoon as part of a film series inspired by Caravaggio. The series begins tonight with Pedro Costa’s 1989 debut film O Sangue (Blood), followed by Italian director Paolo Benvenuti’s Confortorio. On Saturday, see Derek Jarman’s unconventional biopic Caravaggio and Pier Paolo Pasolini’s Mama Rosa. Finally, on Sunday afternoon you can see a free screening of Martin Scorsese’s The Last Temptation of Christ (see yesterday’s Unframed post for more on Scorsese).

As an alternative to Scorsese on Sunday, there is always Andell Family Sunday art-making activities—one of the best free family options in L.A. every weekend. Whichever afternoon option you choose, you can stick around to close out your weekend with a free concert from duo pianists Antoinette Perry and Neal Stulberg, who will perform pieces by Mozart, Schubert, and Grieg at Sundays Live.

Scott Tennent


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