This Weekend at LACMA: New York Noir, De Maria Film, Final Days for Lost Line and Michael Heizer: Actual Size, and More

Happy President’s Day Weekend! The weather is beautiful and our museum in a park has plenty happening inside and out. If you want to soak up the sunlight, take a stroll through Chris Burden’s Urban Light and Michael Heizer’s Levitated Mass, enjoy a drink or a meal at Ray’s and Stark Bar, or spend some time with your kids during our free Andell Family Sunday activities.

Inside the galleries we’ve got something for everyone, from the blockbuster Stanley Kubrick exhibition to nineteenth-century French ceramics or American landscapes, to German Expressionism and cinema. If that’s enough for you, check out the list of even more exhibitions on view.

Fitz Henry Lane, Boston Harbor, Sunset, 1850–55, gift of Jo Ann and Julian Ganz, Jr., in honor of the museum’s 25th anniversary

Fitz Henry Lane, Boston Harbor, Sunset, 1850–55, gift of Jo Ann and Julian Ganz, Jr., in honor of the museum’s 25th anniversary

On the contemporary art front, this is a special weekend. For fans of Walter De Maria and his 2000 Sculpture, stop into the Bing Theater today or Sunday at 3:30 for a free screening of his 1969 film short Hard Core. This weekend is also one of your last chances to see two exhibitions in BCAM—Michael Heizer: Actual Size and Lost Line: Contemporary Art from the Collection, the latter featuring works by the likes of Gabriel Orozco, Robert Smithson, Uta Barth, Steve McQueen, Analia Saban, and many more.

Walter De Maria, The 2000 Sculpture (detail), 1992, Collection of Walter A. Bechtler-Siftung, Switzerland, © 2012 Walter De Maria, photo © 2012 Museum Associates/LACMA

Walter De Maria, The 2000 Sculpture (detail), 1992, Collection of Walter A. Bechtler-Siftung, Switzerland, © 2012 Walter De Maria, photo © 2012 Museum Associates/LACMA

Tonight our New York Noir film series continues with two thrillers—Little Fugitive (new 35mm print!), from 1953, which impacted the French New Wave, and a gritty portrait of the Lower East Side, The Window, from 1949.

Alternatively, step into the Bing Theater on Sunday not for film but for music, where emerging artists from Junior Chamber Music and the USC Thornton School will perform a free concert for our free Sundays Live series.

And of course, don’t forget this is a three-day weekend! Thanks to Target, Monday is a Free Target Holiday Monday (excluding Stanley Kubrick), featuring live music and story time in the Boone Children’s Gallery.

Scott Tennent

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