This Weekend at LACMA: De Maria and French Ceramics Exhibitions Close, Latin American Galleries Open, Sci-Fi Films, Easter Brunch, and More

Two terrific exhibitions are coming to a close this weekend. In the Resnick Pavilion, it’s your last chance to see Walter De Maria’s The 2000 Sculpture—one artwork that fills the entire center space of the building. The piece is made of precisely ordered geometric shapes that, together, measure roughly 33 x 164 feet.

Walter De Maria, The 2000 Sculpture, 1992, Collection of Walter A. Bechtler-Siftung, Switzerland, Photo © 2012 Museum Associates/LACMA

Walter De Maria, The 2000 Sculpture, 1992, Collection of Walter A. Bechtler-Siftung, Switzerland, Photo © 2012 Museum Associates/LACMA

Also closing this weekend is Daily Pleasures: French Ceramics from the MaryLou Boone Collection, on view in the European galleries in the Ahmanson Building. The exhibition gathers 130 examples of French faience and soft-paste porcelain from the 17th and 18th centuries. You can read more about the exhibition from its curator, Elizabeth Williams, or learn about the influence of Chinese porcelain from curator Christina Yu.

Mustard Pot (Moutardier), Olerys-Laugier Manufactory, Moustiers, France, 1745-1749, Decoration painted by Jean-François Pelloquin,  The MaryLou Boone Collection

Mustard Pot (Moutardier), Olerys-Laugier Manufactory, Moustiers, France, 1745-1749, Decoration painted by Jean-François Pelloquin, The MaryLou Boone Collection

Opening Saturday is a new reinstallation of our Latin American art galleries on the fourth floor of the Art of the Americas building. Read more about the changes to the gallery and look at some of the new highlights in curator Ilona Katzew’s post from earlier this week.

Other exhibitions on view right now include Compass for Surveyors: 19th-Century Landscapes, in the Art of the Americas Building, which garnered a great review from the Los Angeles Times today; Ming Masterpieces from the Shanghai Museum; Ends and Exits: Contemporary Art from the Collections of LACMA and the Broad Art Foundation; and Stanley Kubrick. Kubrick fans—and especially 2001 fans—will want to check out the four films we’re screening tonight and tomorrow as part of our series Beyond the Infinite: Science Fiction after Kubrick. Tonight kicks off with George Lucas’ debut, THX 1138 followed by Mike Hodges’ 1974 adaptation of Michael Chrichton’s The Terminal Man. Saturday sees John Carpenter’s sci-fi comedy Dark Star—which pointedly parodies Kubrick’s slow-moving 2001. followed by Andrei Tarkovsky’s epic masterpiece Solaris (trailer below).

This and every Saturday, we offer free family tours of the collection. Tours meet in the BP Grand Entrance near Urban Light and last approximately 45 minutes.

Families are also welcome to join us for Easter Brunch at Ray’s. Menu highlights include artichoke soup, blue crab deviled eggs, house made black pudding, onion and gruyere quiche, pork belly with eggs, and the famous Benedict Burger with a sunny egg on top. Make a reservation for Easter brunch.

Finally, our free classical music concert series Sundays Live continues Sunday at 6 pm with LA Opera’s Domingo-Thornton  Young Artist Program performing works to celebrate the centennial of legendary composer Benjamin Britten.

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,090 other followers

%d bloggers like this: