This Weekend at LACMA: LACMA9 Art+Film Lab Departs Hacienda Heights, Nowruz Rings in Spring, Final Weekend of “See the Light,” and More!

March 21, 2014

Warm up to spring with LACMA this weekend. To start, take a quick jaunt to the traveling Hacienda Heights Art+Film Lab during its last days at Steinmetz Park. On Friday evening polish up on international films with a free screening of Even the Rain (Tambíen la Lluvia) at 7 pm; learn video editing techniques during the free Instant Film Workshop on Saturday at noon; or contribute your personal story as a Southern Californian to the Oral History project on Friday at 3 pm and Sunday at 12:30 pm. This mobile art space has been going around the county, providing opportunities for neighboring communities to interact with art and film in exciting ways, and will make its next stop in Montebello starting April 4.

LACMA 9 Art+Film Lab, photo by Duncan Cheng

LACMA9 Art+Film Lab, photo by Duncan Cheng

Meanwhile on campus, we’re rolling out the red carpet for the 2014 Farhang Foundation Short Film Festival taking place on Saturday at 6 pm. Celebrating Iranian heritage, this event showcases emerging filmmaking talent from around the world and includes a reception after the awards have been handed out. Then, all day on Sunday, celebrate the arrival of spring at the Nowruz Celebration with a full day of free activities at the museum. Guests will be treated to a traditional costume parade, live musical performances, storytelling and calligraphy for children, and a traditional Nowruz display, Haft Sîn. The weekly edition of Sundays Live keeps the festivities going with a performance from L.A.-based Lyris Quartet on Sunday at 6 pm.

Hassan Hajjaj, My Rock Stars Experimental, Volume 1, 2012, Mandisa Dumesweni, purchased with funds provided by Art of the Middle East: CONTEMPORARY, courtesy of Rose Issa Projects

Hassan Hajjaj, My Rock Stars Experimental, Volume 1, 2012, Mandisa Dumesweni, purchased with funds provided by Art of the Middle East: CONTEMPORARY, courtesy of Rose Issa Projects

Around the galleries, make it a point to see the history of photography in See the Light—Photography, Perception, Cognition: The Marjorie and Leonard Vernon Collection before it closes on Sunday. This exhibition showcases over 200 images from one of the world’s most extensive photography collections and gives viewers the insight into the medium’s position between art and science. Across campus check out truly gorgeous artworks from Japan in The Color of Life: Japanese Paintings from the Price Collection. And, from our permanent collection, discover how Hassan Hajjaj: My Rock Stars Experimental, Volume 1, 2012 blurs cultural boundaries through a three-channel video featuring nine performances from an international array of musicians. Spring has sprung.

Roberto Ayala


Before It Was Art

March 20, 2014

Photography is a ubiquitous part of our modern world. And art, itself, has so breached every aspect of our seeing that to imagine that the earlier photos weren’t considered art seems unthinkable. And equally so, it would have thrown into question the very nature of how photography has informed our ideas of beauty, information, and reality itself.

William Henry Fox Talbot, The Fruit Sellers, c. 1844, the Marjorie and Leonard Vernon Collection, gift of the Annenberg Foundation, acquired from Carol Vernon and Robert Turbin

The exhibition of See the Light—Photography, Perception, Cognition: The Marjorie and Leonard Vernon Collection is a beautifully conceived adventure and journey through science and art. The show provides a unique and transformative focus to which I am drawn.

Of course, photography was not always considered art. Its birth through technology and science would alter the nature of what was accepted as creativity. At the Salon of 1859, Charles Baudelaire stated, “As the photographic industry was a refuge of every would-be painter . . . too ill-endowed or too lazy to complete his studies, this universal infatuation bore not only the mark of a blindness, an imbecility, but had also the air of vengeance.” But of course there were others who saw its profound social implications, and how it echoed the new age. Lady Elizabeth Eastlake, wife of Royal Academy director, wrote in Quarterly Review in 1857, “photography is made for the present age, in which the desire for art resides in a small minority, but the craving, or rather the necessity for cheap, prompt, and correct facts in the public at large.” Science was to be its authority. To quote Britt Salvesen’s beautifully concise description, photography is “a dream of the mechanical transcription.” Though it must be said that even earlier, at Crystal Palace, in London, in 1851, the exhibition had “established looking as a form of consumption.”

Edward Steichen, Steeplechase Day, After the Grand Prix, Longchamps Racetrack—Paris, c. 1906, the Marjorie and Leonard Vernon Collection, gift of The Annenberg Foundation, acquired from Carol Vernon and Robert Turbin

Edward Steichen, Steeplechase Day, After the Grand Prix, Longchamps Racetrack—Paris, c. 1906, the Marjorie and Leonard Vernon Collection, gift of the Annenberg Foundation, acquired from Carol Vernon and Robert Turbin, © The Estate of Edward Steichen / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

In a very real sense, photography and art were inextricably the phenomenon of perception, and the exhibition’s survey of the science of seeing suggests an evolution and clarification of visual understanding. And yet, the notion of factual accuracy would shimmer in its own radiant presence without the label of art.

It is these early images, which merely capture an enduring moment in time, that most interest me. For me, this is a past without artifice—a deep past where the very nature of the lives they were living is palpable, in spite of a mountain of literature and paintings. In the Edward Steichen’s Steeplechase Day, After the Grand Prix, Longchamps Racetrack—Paris (1907), the beau monde is caught in mid-action. There’s an energy, which is utterly tactile in the mesdames’ gathering of their sumptuous white frocks as they prepare to stroll.

The swish of fabric can be sensed in their steps, their aristocratic gestures, with Proustian airs and expectation, just behind the black-lace veil and umbrella, their white shoes, their flowered and netting-festooned wide brim-hats demand our attention. The image bristles emotion; a kind of kinetic energy of reality—one can practically smell the fresh dirt and perfume. They are moving around the carriage’s large back wheel, and the servant in the foreground recedes as if in the clutter of grays and blacks of background. The mesdames in their world of detail and anticipation, are locked in time. And for those split seconds, a way of life is illuminated—it’s alive. It is not a movie still; it is a photograph of fact.

Carl Christian Heinrich Kühn, Hans Kühn, c. 1906, the Marjorie and Leonard Vernon Collection, gift of the Annenberg Foundation, acquired from Carol Vernon and Robert Turbin, © Estate of Heinrich Kühn

Maybe it is the clothing, the uncontrived there-ness that the earlier images possess, for we know the science could be exhaustively involved. Heinrich Kuhn’s Hans Kühn (1906), features a boy, in white collar, standing wide legged in black-flared shirt and knickerbockers, with his father’s walking cane with a silver ball top sparkling in his hardly visible fingers. The perfection of the wide-brim hat shading his eye, but not the pleasure seen in his mouth, seems to offer a kind of sweet authority. Wild flowers scattered around his leather high tops and the sense of the spring walk in the countryside gives the viewer an entry into the image, and in spite of its overall softness and the craft of printing, there’s slight time travel, so to speak, as innocence prevails.

David Octavius and Robert Adamson, Newhaven Fishermen, c. 1844, the Marjorie and Leonard Vernon Collection, gift of the Annenberg Foundation, acquired from Carol Vernon and Robert Turbin

From the beau monde, to innocence in a country field, to David Octavius and Robert Adamson’s Newhaven Fishermen (1845), salt print of the weather-beaten demeanor of fishermen in their stovepipe hats and broad frames, all the photos in their moments expressing a realness that sits solidly in the early present, connecting us in a time-honored fact, or truth, like nothing else.

As we go back in time, these images of a bygone era, where science and the practitioners have laid before us what on the surface seemed simple, but in truth, were profound philosophical and physiological developments. A host of psychological investigations were spawned over the nature of the subjective and sensation, the very structure of consciousness in the picture making—or Pictorialism, the term of the day, was made the center of attention.

Of course, when considering that some thousands of years of understanding was the background for all that followed, one should hardly be amazed. Nevertheless from the position in viewing them now, it’s as if the very nature of perceived image in this mechanized form, photography, has within it an organizational beauty that needs no affirmation. It created its own idiomatic aesthetic. It added another dimension to the human perception and with it an entirely new equation of perceived beauty, memory and reality, a reality whose democratic reach was beyond the imagination. I would say that photography was the brave new world. Or as Robert Demachy, a leading French representative of the new direction said, “We have slipped into the Temple of Art by a back door.”

Hylan Booker


Traces of the 19th Century

March 17, 2014

Remembering LACMA’s photography holdings before the acquisition of the Vernon Collection in 2008, former Photography Department head and curator Charlotte Cotton remarked, “when you went on to the museum database and searched for photographs from the 19th century, you could come up with, like, one picture . . . this was not a historical collection.” While LACMA did own more than one photograph from the era, Cotton was correct in essence. The acquisition of the Vernon Collection nearly tripled LACMA’s holdings in 19th-century photography, bringing works into the collection that would have been otherwise impossible to acquire (due to scarcity or price) by any other means.

Almost one-third of the works in the Vernon Collection (nearly 1,100 photographs) were produced before the outbreak of the First World War. From the first transaction to the last, the Vernons passionately collected the photography of the Victorian era. Maggi Weston, who sold the Vernons their first photographic works, remembered, “I wasn’t used to people in Los Angeles liking 19th-century work, but I took it with me to meet Leonard and Marjorie [Vernon] in L.A. . . . We got into this long discussion over the 19th-century work, and they ooh’d and awe’d. . . . They bought $10,000 worth of photographs on that first viewing.” This interest in the first several decades of photography’s history was given further strength by a trip to Oxford, England, in 1985, where the Vernons studied photography from the Victorian age with photographers and historians Anne Hammond and Mike Weaver, taking the opportunity while there to expand their growing collection of 19th-century work.

Benjamin Brecknell Turner, Whitby Abbey, Yorkshire, North Transept, c. 1854, The Marjorie and Leonard Vernon Collection, gift of The Annenberg Foundation and Carol Vernon and Robert Turbin

Benjamin Brecknell Turner, Whitby Abbey, Yorkshire, North Transept, c. 1854, the Marjorie and Leonard Vernon Collection, gift of the Annenberg Foundation, acquired from Carol Vernon and Robert Turbin

The exhibition and accompanying catalog See the Light—although containing only a small, if exemplary, fraction of the works in the collection—offers a thorough education in the evolution of the medium across the 19th century. From the ghostly impressions of the earliest salted paper prints to the warm tones and bleached-out skies of mid-century albumens, and the moody platinum, bromoil, and gelatin silver prints from the turn-of-the-20th-century, the viewer has the unique opportunity to explore the range of photography’s possibilities in its formative decades. Even the most cursory perusal of the first few galleries of the exhibition, which are dominated by works from the 19th century, is enough to remind us how imprecise it is to use “black and white” to describe photography before the advent of color. A broad range of hues and colors etched themselves into Victorian era photographic papers. We quickly surmise that experimentation was important for early photographers—testing new methods, seeking new visual effects, and employing novel strategies for fixing, toning, and printing photographs. We are reminded that photography emerged and developed at the nexus of science, art and commerce—the dizzying diversity of materials and approaches testifies to that fact.

Gustave Le Gray, The Great Wave, Sète, 1857, The Marjorie and Leonard Vernon Collection, gift of The Annenberg Foundation and Carol Vernon and Robert Turbin

Gustave Le Gray, The Great Wave, Sète, 1857, the Marjorie and Leonard Vernon Collection, gift of The Annenberg Foundation, acquired from Carol Vernon and Robert Turbin

The one figure who perhaps most exemplified the combination of science, art, and commerce in photography’s early history was William Henry Fox Talbot, who is represented by four works on display in the show. One of the leading figures in the “simultaneous invention” of photography in the 1830s, Talbot was the first to patent a positive/negative process (the salted paper Calotype). Although he is often associated with his scientific and technical achievements, he was also animated by an interest in art and aesthetics, and his images are some of the most haunting and engrossing in the history of photography.

William Henry Fox Talbot, Lace, 1857, the Marjorie and Leonard Vernon Collection, gift of The Annenberg Foundation, acquired from Carol Vernon and Robert Turbin

William Henry Fox Talbot, Lace, 1841, the Marjorie and Leonard Vernon Collection, gift of the Annenberg Foundation, acquired from Carol Vernon and Robert Turbin

It has often been pointed out that Talbot’s interest in photography emerged in part because he was a failed draughtsman—incapable of making effective drawings, he invented what he called “photogenic drawing,” the virtues of which he spelled out in his book with the equally telling title The Pencil of Nature, on display in the exhibition. Works such as A Fruit Piece borrow from the traditions of still-life painting to draw attention to the fleeting, even unsettling, ephemerality of objects in the physical world. His works used the veridical authority of the camera to draw attention to the oddness of things—the physical thing-ness of objects, for lack of a more elegant description. The eerie isolation of the objects in darkened space emphasizes the literalness of the camera’s transcription of reality, and reminds us that these real things in the world will decay and rot, while their photographic trace will remain. For these reasons, and certainly more, Talbot was a favorite of the Vernons, who owned nine works by him—a truly astounding number, given their rarity. The acquisition of the Vernon Collection represented a four-fold increase of the works by Talbot in LACMA’s collection, and for that, we are forever grateful.

William Henry Fox Talbot, A Fruit Piece, 1844–46, the Marjorie and Leonard Vernon Collection, gift of The Annenberg Foundation, acquired from Carol Vernon and Robert Turbin

William Henry Fox Talbot, A Fruit Piece, 1844–46, the Marjorie and Leonard Vernon Collection, gift of The Annenberg Foundation, acquired from Carol Vernon and Robert Turbin

Another photographer working in 19th-century England who was of particular importance to the Vernons—and to the history of photography—is Julia Margaret Cameron. For her, photography was an expressive medium that could be harnessed in the service of fine art. Actively involved in the artistic and literary culture of her day, she made photographs in her glasshouse studio, often costuming her subjects to evoke Arthurian legend and Pre-Raphaelite painting and drawing. Using the then-current wet-collodion process, she never sought to make finely detailed and neatly developed images, and her works are characterized by their vital expressiveness and sense of emotion and immediacy. Unlike most studio portraits of the day, Cameron’s images, such as that of Mrs. Herbert Duckworth on display in the exhibition, lack the rigid frontality and formality characteristic of the form. Cameron influenced the impressionistic, dreamlike imagery that would become a central focus of photographers eager to assert photography’s artistic merits in the succeeding generation.

Julia Margaret Cameron, The Little Novice & Queen Guinevere In The Holy House Of Almsbury, 1874, the Marjorie and Leonard Vernon Collection, gift of The Annenberg Foundation, acquired from Carol Vernon and Robert Turbin

Julia Margaret Cameron, The Little Novice & Queen Guinevere In The Holy House Of Almsbury, 1874, the Marjorie and Leonard Vernon Collection, gift of The Annenberg Foundation, acquired from Carol Vernon and Robert Turbin

Julia Margaret Cameron,  ENLARGEMY GALLERYCOMMENTTAGSHAREDOWNLOAD IMAGE* * Nearly 20,000 images of artworks the museum believes to be in the public domain are available to download on this site. Other images may be protected by copyright and other intellectual property rights. By using any of these images you agree to LACMA's Terms of Use. Mrs. Herbert Duckworth (née Julia Jackson), c. 1867, the Marjorie and Leonard Vernon Collection, gift of The Annenberg Foundation, acquired from Carol Vernon and Robert Turbin

Julia Margaret Cameron, Mrs. Herbert Duckworth (née Julia Jackson), c. 1867, the Marjorie and Leonard Vernon Collection, gift of The Annenberg Foundation, acquired from Carol Vernon and Robert Turbin

Whereas Cameron’s images impress with their emotional depth and sense of immediacy, many of her most notable contemporaries—such as fellow countrymen Francis Frith and Antonio Beato, as well as Carleton Watkins in the United States—sought to harness the power of photography to create monumental, timeless images, freezing the physical world and capturing it as accurately as possible for posterity (and for commercial gain). With the notable exception of the washed-out skies (a product of the sensitivity of the chemicals used in development to the blue end of the color spectrum), these images offer a detailed catalog of the built and natural environment, designed to bring exotic places into the homes of metropolitan consumers.

Francis Frith, Pyramids Of El-Geezeh (from the Southwest), c. 1857, the Marjorie and Leonard Vernon Collection, gift of The Annenberg Foundation, acquired from Carol Vernon and Robert Turbin

Francis Frith, Pyramids Of El-Geezeh (from the Southwest), c. 1857, the Marjorie and Leonard Vernon Collection, gift of The Annenberg Foundation, acquired from Carol Vernon and Robert Turbin

 When standing in front of these monumental images of far-flung destinations, we are reminded of the physical exertion that they must have required. Contact prints made from glass plates of substantial size, these images required an arsenal of equipment to capture and develop the image without the aid of running water or a climate-controlled development room. Watkins’s The Secret Town Trestle, Central Pacific Railroad, Placer County is the very apotheosis of mid-19th-century engineering—the feat of capturing the image nearly on par with the act of building the railways that knitted together a rapidly expanding country.

Carleton Watkins, The Secret Town Trestle, Central Pacific Railroad, Placer County, c. 1876, , c. 1867, the Marjorie and Leonard Vernon Collection, gift of The Annenberg Foundation, acquired from Carol Vernon and Robert Turbin

Carleton E. Watkins, The Secret Town Trestle, Central Pacific Railroad, Placer County, c. 1876, the Marjorie and Leonard Vernon Collection, gift of The Annenberg Foundation, acquired from Carol Vernon and Robert Turbin

One of the great masters of 19th-century American photography, Watkins was very sparsely represented in LACMA’s collection before the arrival of the Vernon Collection. The Vernons were partly responsible for the escalation in prices that placed Watkins prints out of the hands of many museums. Denise Bethel, now senior vice president and head of Department for Photographs at Sotheby’s, noted that the Vernons were willing to pay “a small fortune for one of the few Watkins mammoth-plate albums to come to auction. It is a story that has since made its way into the legends of the market, and I can tell you that it would have taken nerves of steel to go that high on any photographic property in 1979.” We are certainly glad to know (now that the collection has made its way to LACMA) that the Vernons had such nerve.

Frederick H. Evans, A Sea of Steps—Wells Cathedral, 1903, the Marjorie and Leonard Vernon Collection, gift of the Annenberg Foundation, acquired from Carol Vernon and Robert Turbin, © Frederick H. Evans, courtesy Janet B. Stenner

Frederick H. Evans, A Sea of Steps—Wells Cathedral, 1903, the Marjorie and Leonard Vernon Collection, gift of the Annenberg Foundation, acquired from Carol Vernon and Robert Turbin, © Frederick H. Evans, courtesy Janet B. Stenner

The last major purchase of Leonard’s life was also one for the record books, and represented the culmination of a decades-long love affair with the photography of the 19th century. Frederick Evans’s A Sea of Steps, Wells Cathedral, was referred to by many who knew the Vernons as his “Holy Grail”—the one work that he simply had to have. He acquired the work in 2007, not long before he passed. Although the Vernons had acquired an Evans portfolio several years prior, it was incomplete, with this image missing. When it came up for auction in New York, he was, by all accounts, ecstatic, and he insisted that he would not let the piece pass him by. Although he wasn’t in the best of health, he aggressively managed the transaction from bed, insuring that he was the highest bidder. Once it was acquired, he had the gallery in his home hung entirely with images of stairs, with this as the centerpiece. So while the image was not in the Vernon’s home for long, it was certainly a showpiece during the time that it was there.

A Sea of Steps, with its atmospheric tones rendered so vividly in this platinum print, is a powerful testament to the ability of photography to apprehend the world, and to imbue it with new meaning. The Vernon Collection has done something similar for LACMA’s photography holdings—allowing curators and visitors alike to bring their own interpretations to photography’s long, multilayered history.

Ryan Linkof, Ralph M. Parsons Fellow, Wallis Annenberg Department of Photography


This Weekend at LACMA: 2014 Season of Art & Music Presents Calder Quartet, Free Film and Tours, Can’t-Miss Exhibitions, and More!

March 14, 2014

Each week you have but 48 hours to unwind and experience something new—spend a few of them at LACMA. On Saturday the 2014 season of Art & Music kicks off with a performance from the Calder Quartet with red fish blue fish at 7:30 pm in the Bing Theater. The four-piece ensemble has been playing together for over 15 years and is recognized for reimagining the modern role of a string quartet. Hear why the New York Times calls the group “superb” and how they are pushing a centuries-old medium to new planes. Tickets are still available online or by phone.

Earlier, on Friday at our roving art laboratory, the Hacienda Heights Art+Film Lab (located at Steinmetz Park), contribute to the oral-history project at 3 pm with your personal accounts of life in the Southland. Then at 7 pm see The Tree of Life, directed by Terrence Malick and starring Brad Pitt. Set in 1950s Texas, the film contemplates human existence, time, and life on earth through provocative sequences and an evocative soundtrack.

Then on Sunday, families are invited to Andell Family Sundays at 12:30 pm, where children and adults explore the art of soccer, through the lens of Fútbol: The Beautiful Game. Andell Family Sundays happen each Sunday and comes free with museum admission. Later in the day be a part of Sundays Live featuring the Capitol Ensemble with pianist Rina Dokshitsky at 6 pm. This program is always free and open to the public.

William Henry Fox Talbot, A Fruit Piece, 1844–46, the Marjorie and Leonard Vernon Collection, gift of The Annenberg Foundation, acquired from Carol Vernon and Robert Turbin

William Henry Fox Talbot, A Fruit Piece, 1844–46, the Marjorie and Leonard Vernon Collection, gift of The Annenberg Foundation, acquired from Carol Vernon and Robert Turbin

And in our galleries find the entire history of photography in the comprehensive exhibition See the Light—Photography, Perception, Cognition: The Marjorie and Leonard Vernon Collection (closing next week on Sunday, March 23). For you early birds, take advantage of the free, 50-minute guided tour of the exhibition on Saturday at noon. Calder and Abstraction: From Avant-Garde to Iconic is another exhibition that can’t be missed. Learn more about the legendary artists and his work during the free guided tour at 11:30 am on Sunday. Last of all, discover something new from our permanent collection with a 20-minute tour of our Impressionism artworks on Saturday at 1 pm or see the latest installment of German Expressionism in Visions of the South. The clock’s ticking!

Roberto Ayala


The Calder Quartet

March 10, 2014

The Calder Quartet has performed at a wide range of venues throughout the United States, from the Walt Disney Concert Hall right here in Los Angeles to Le Poisson Rouge in New York. This Saturday, March 15, LACMA hosts the Calder Quartet in their second appearance at the Bing Theater, where they will be joined on the stage by red fish blue fish in the first installment of the Art and Music series.

The group, whose name is inspired by the work of Alexander Calder, formed at the University of Southern California’s Thornton School of Music, after which they continued studies at the Colburn Conservatory of Music and the Juilliard School. The upcoming performance by Benjamin Jacobson, Andrew Bulbrook, Jonathan Moerschel, and Eric Byers is held, fittingly, occasion of the exhibition Calder and Abstraction: From Avant-Garde to Iconic, currently on view through July 27 in the Resnick Pavilion at LACMA.

Calder Quartet violinist Andrew Bulbrook spoke with LACMA about Calder as an inspiration and their performance at the Bing.

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This question is obvious, but how did your group arrive at the name Calder Quartet? Describe elements from the artist’s work that inspire the group.

We played together for five years as friends before choosing a name. In the beginning our quartet was never a plan, it evolved and grew out of our friendship. We picked a name when we needed it for our first engagements and we had encountered Alexander Calder’s work and also had learned a little bit about his work ethic. The mobile is considered by many (including Sartre) as a very musical form of sculpture and had inspired composers to create work. What looks effortless and moves easily is the product of consistent and daily work. Calder went into the studio every day and practiced his art. That really inspired us.

How did you go about selecting pieces to perform at LACMA?

In talking to Mitch Glickman about the program we decided to anchor it around a new work by the percussionist Andy Akiho that was written for us a few years ago and takes it’s name from the idea of the mobile. From there we connected the dots to bringing in a percussion ensemble, UCSD’s red fish blue fish under the direction of Steve Schick, and also to a larger recording and commissioning project that we have been working on for the past few years called Eclectic Currents. It’s a recording of 12 works by leading emerging composers. (We’ve played pieces from this project at Blum and Poe in Culver City, and the project was supported by 110 individual donors through Kickstarter as well as grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Copland Fund.) Andy’s quartet is part of that project and we thought celebrating young composers and young percussionists together would be a great connection and a nice celebration of Alexander Calder and Eclectic Currents. A decade ago we learned that Calder had been friends with Sasha Schneider of the Budapest Quartet and had donated work to help with his educational efforts and currently the Calder Foundation runs a prize to help develop the career of a living artist. This connection to living composers and supporting them really made sense.

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Were they informed by any interactions with the exhibition?

We all attended the show and loved it. We have the good fortune to appear in Disney Hall regularly and it’s great to see Frank Gehry creating amazing spaces for music and art. The way a room full of mobiles slowly undulates feels like quartet-four voices that move coherently and beautifully together without any apparent leadership.

Have you previously collaborated with red fish blue fish?

We are long time admirers of Steve Schick and while this will be our first performance with him and red fish blue fish we have worked with him for many years at the Carlsbad Music Festival in San Diego where we have been the founding quartet in residence. Carlsbad and UCSD Artpower helped commission many of the works that we will play at LACMA.


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