Director David Slade on the Legacy of Stanley Kubrick

January 23, 2013

Our free Stanley Kubrick app for iPad/iPhone (and, coming soon, Android!) includes a number of original interviews, including an excerpt from this one with director David Slade.

Slade was kind enough to visit during the installation of the exhibition to share his memories and thoughts about the legacy of Kubrick’s filmmaking. Slade was at Kubrick’s headquarters in the UK on the day the legendary director passed away, a day he recalls in the interview segment included in the app. But Slade’s tribute extends well beyond Kubrick’s death, to the lasting impact of his films on directors working today. Here, he talks about being shaken by A Clockwork Orange, and what it means to cultivate a creative vision.

Amy Heibel, video by Alexa Oona Schulz


Free Kubrick App

November 27, 2012

Fans of the exhibition Stanley Kubrick will likely find the free app for iPad/iPhone that we released last week to be the next-best thing to a trip to the Kubrick Archive at the University of the Arts London. Thanks to the Archive, the app includes photos and documents that provide rare insight into the director’s working process.

Dress rehearsals for the spaceship crew for 2001: A Space Odyssey, with costume design by Hardy Amies, London. © Warner Brothers Entertainment Inc., Photo courtesy of the Stanley Kubrick Archive at the University of the Arts, London.

Some of the highlights included in the app are outright amusing. Take, for example, the correspondence around the production of 2001: A Space Odyssey, regarding the computer HAL. “Does IBM know that one of the main themes of the story is a psychotic computer?” Kubrick asks Roger Caras.

Letter, courtesy of the Stanley Kubrick Archive at the University of the Arts, London.

We also included Kubrick’s handwritten notes and drawings describing the movement of the Australopithecus characters in the film, along with dozens of other script documents, production notes, and images.

Kubrick’s detailed notes regarding the Australopithecus characters in 2001: A Space Odyssey. Courtesy of the Stanley Kubrick Archive at the University of the Arts, London.

The app features excerpts from a rare 1965 interview with Kubrick courtesy of interviewer Jeremy Bernstein. Kubrick talks about everything from his early childhood (“I was a school misfit…“) to working in Hollywood (“Film directing is a misnomer for anybody who seriously wants to make films…“).

And we included exclusive video interviews with Stan Douglas, Chris Nolan, David Slade, Terry Semel, and Douglas Trumbull. Trumbull reflects on the special effects work he did for 2001: A Space Odyssey and, like the others, pays tribute to the legacy of a director who helped define the art of film.

Amy Heibel


Wilson Sisters Explore Stanley Kubrick’s Unfinished Business

November 15, 2012

Artists Jane and Louise Wilson had a rare opportunity: they were invited to take part in a residency at the Stanley Kubrick archive in London as part of a commission by Animate Projects and the British Film Institute. Amidst an overwhelming collection of material from the late filmmaker’s career, they found themselves drawn to documents, records and remnants of the creative process associated with a film about the Holocaust, called Aryan Papers, that Kubrick researched for decades but never produced. The film was to be an adaptation of Louis Begley’s semi-autobiographical novel Wartime Lies. The sisters contacted the actress, Johanna Ter Steege, whom Kubrick intended to play the lead in the film.  They interviewed her, and she appears in the Wilson sisters film installation, titled Unfolding the Aryan Papers, which is presented in an enclosed space lined with mirrors within the Stanley Kubrick exhibition.

Louise Wilson had this to say about the project:

Amy Heibel


More Burton-Inspired Pics from the Public

August 1, 2011

Attendance to our Tim Burton exhibition is going strong two months into its five month run. One of the best things about the exhibition is how our visitors continue to interact with it online. We invited visitors to post their own Burton-esque images to our flickr group to see things that seem to have taken inspiration from Burton’s aesthetic. We love to see this multimedia feed grow with an assortment of beautiful, mysterious, playful, gothic, colorful, and dark images.

Steel branches from alexcap1101

Steel branches

Check out the Flickr group here.

sonicshadowlover13 submitted this image of her Jack Skellington-inspired outfit, complete with skeleton gloves and choker.

shaunsaumell submitted several images of a beautiful, surreal landscape that look right out of The Nightmare Before Christmas.

tagletwitch created an amazing sculpture  from what looks like recycled wires.

Some contributors have drawn their own dark, Burton-esque creatures like taylorwchristensen’s Stick Boy and Match Girl and mouse25’s My Pretty.

Scroll through all of the submissions for more sketches, costumes, house decor, hairstyles, tattoos, and some inspiration from nature.

Submit your Burton-esque images here.

Alex Capriotti


Burton-inspired pics from the public

May 18, 2011

In anticipation of Tim Burton, opening May 29th, we invited the public to show us their “Burton-esque” photos. We have 97 so far. This one comes from our own Erin Sorensen:

A Burton-inspired vision by Erin Sorensen.

Check out the Flickr group here.

garydeo333 submitted this image of Edward Scissorhands, with other Burton characters on the tip of his left hand. “My tribute to the films of Tim Burton,” he says.

ammcnelis submitted several pics of the ultimate Tim Burton (wedding?) cake.

sally’smom1 submitted some pretty cute pics of someone small in dressed as (who else?) Sally, from Nightmare Before Christmas.

Miki has some gorgeous contributions including a photo of a sculpture of Jack Skellington carved from foam.

Some contributors looked at nature through a Burton-inspired lens – like this image of a woodpecker, camouflaged against a tree.

There’s more: tattoos, high school fashions, haircuts, gardens, and…a selection of things from under the sea.

Submit your Burton-esque images here.

Amy Heibel


This Weekend at LACMA: Eakins Lecture, Film Foundation Series, and More

October 8, 2010

Exhibitions, lectures, concerts, films… we’ve got a little of everything this weekend. On the exhibition front, there are seven different special exhibitions on view right now, starting with Olmec, Fashioning Fashion, and Eye for the Sensual in the new Resnick Pavilion. In the Ahmanson Building you’ll find In the Service of the Buddha: Tibetan Furniture from the Hayward Family Collection and EATLACMA. Harvest time is approaching for the artist-created gardens of EATLACMA, so keep on the lookout as you walk around campus. Finally, there’s Catherine Opie: Figure and Landscape and Manly Pursuits: The Sporting Images of Thomas Eakins, both of which close next week.

 

Thomas Eakins, Wrestlers, 1899.

 

Saturday would be an ideal day to take in Eakins, as we’re also holding a special symposium, “The Body Imagined: Sports & Art in American Culture, Then & Now.” Tad Beck, the artist behind the Palimpsest exhibition embedded within Manly Pursuits, will be on hand, along with Los Angeles Times sports journalist Mike Bresnahan; Jennifer Doyle, professor at UC Riverside; and Amy Werbel, professor at St. Michael’s College, all discussing the role of sports and art in the evolving cultural attitudes toward the human body. The lecture is free and starts at 1 pm.

 

Muhammad Aza, Portrait of Nasir ud din Haidar, c. 1830. India, Uttar Pradesh, Lucknow. Oil on canvas 36-1/4 x 28-3/8 in. (92.1 x 72.1 cm). Collection Drs. Aziz and Deanna Khan. Photo courtesy Drs. Aziz and Deanna Khan.

 

Sunday sees another lecture, also free: “Lucknow through the Lens of Bollywood.” The lively presentation of film clips from Hindi and Bollywood directors from the 1960s to the present will also include a live tabla performance. This will be a good primer for our upcoming exhibition, India’s Fabled City: The Art of Courtly Lucknow, opening in December.

If music is your game, we’ve got two free concerts. Tonight (Friday), the Ernie Watts Quartet plays Jazz at LACMA. Watts is a two-time Grammy winner and has played with plenty of greats over the last forty years, from Cannonball Adderly to Frank Zappa. Sunday, we continue our Sundays Live series with another concert be performers from the New England Conservatory, in celebration of Robert Schumann’s bicentennial.

This weekend also kicks off our latest film series, a 20th Anniversary Tribute to the Film Foundation. The series will run every weekend for the rest of the month and features a diverse slate of films—all of which have been restored and preserved by the Film Foundation. Tonight sees a noir double feature with The Big Combo and They Made Me a Fugitive. Saturday, the foreign masterpiece Pather Panchali will be followed by the dance classic The Red Shoes. Here’s a trailer for the latter:

Stretching into next week, we should note that Monday is a holiday—we’ll be open (but not free, as we are for other holiday Mondays). But Tuesday we will be free, as we are on the second Tuesday of every month If you’re free you should come down, maybe catch The Swan, with Grace Kelly and Alec Guinness, during the Tuesday Matinee—just two bucks!

Scott Tennent


Tarzan vs IBM: Manny Farber (1917-2008)

October 20, 2008

At the time of Manny Farber’s death this summer, he hadn’t published any film criticism since the late seventies, focusing instead on his collage-like, perspective-defying paintings. (The image used here appears in the latest issue of CinemaScope, which also includes a “guide to Farber“). For me, Farber remains the greatest film critic the United States ever produced (check some of his greatest hits at the invaluable Greencine blog). He ventured further out than most of his peers, all the while maintaining the swiftness and vinegary tone of a thirties B-picture roughneck and the incisive poetics of a Frankfurt school brainiac. His bebop syntax, brut exuberance, and sculptural texture are all immediately striking. But there’s also a ceaseless squirreling of ideas amid all that kinetic language.

Manny Farber, Sherlock Jr., 1982

Too much film criticism remains just perfunctory writing at the service of utilitarian opinions. Farber’s clutter of angles and tangents, the vulgar modernism and pulp formalism, always served a wealth of ideas. A champion of Wellman and Akerman, Walsh and Snow, his taste can only be considered eclectic when set against an incurious narrowness of cultists or so-called experts. Consider this sentence, written somewhat prophetically in 1968, on Godard:

At the end of this director’s career, there will probably be a hundred films, each one a bizarrely different species, with its own excruciatingly singular skeleton, tendons, plumage… already he has a zoo that includes a pink parakeet (A Woman Is a Woman), diamond-black snake (Contempt), whooping crane (Band of Outsiders), jack rabbit (Carabiniers) and a mock Monogram turtle (Breathless).

Godard and Farber cross paths at this year’s Viennale Film Festival. Godard’s first transmission in years is an erstwhile “trailer” for the festival; there will also be a sidebar tribute at the fest devoted to films of Farber’s liking. Surprisingly, it’ll only include slapstick silents. It seems much of Farber remains unexplored terrain.

Bernardo Rondeau


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